Ely

2 John Beckett Court, Chapel Street Ely, Cambs CB6 1TA

2
John Beckett Court, Chapel Street
Ely, Cambs
CB6 1TA
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

ST MARY'S STREET

1082 (North Side) House in the grounds of No 28
TL 5380 1/194

II

An early C19 brick house, stuccoed on the west front.

2 storeys. 4 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in moulded stucco architraves. The ground storey windows have small cornices. The doorway has a stucco decrease with pilasters and eoridee. Roof tiled (C20).

Keys: 
House
Period: 
E 19. M 20
List Date: 
19/06/72
Date: 
NONE
List Num: 
48787
Dist Num: 
5138
Side: 
North
Wall material: 
Gault brick
Roof material: 
Plain tile
Refs: 
ST MARY'S STREET 1082 (North Side) House in the grounds of No 28 TL 5380 1/194 II An early C19 brick house, stuccoed on the west front. 2 storeys. 4 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in moulded stucco architraves. The ground storey windows have small cornices. The doorway has a stucco decrease with pilasters and eoridee. Roof tiled (C20).
S Status: 
CA
Other information: 
See record Nos 007591 for No 28, and 007593 for the wall to No 28.
Entry Rec: 
28/10/86
Grid Ref: 
TL 53868040
Easting: 
5538600
Northing: 
2804000
Latitude: 
52.399576573587
Longitude: 
0.26176261491433

2 Waterside Ely, Cambs CB7 4AZ

2
Waterside
Ely, Cambs
CB7 4AZ
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

WATERSIDE

1082 (West Side) No 2
TL 5479 2/222

II GV

(Including No 58 Fore Hill)

A C18 range of brick houses probably re-roofed in the C19.

2 storeys. 5 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in flush cased frames. A raised brick band runs between the storeys. Simple cottage doors. Roof slate.

Nos 2 to 12 (even) form a group with Nos 1 to 25 (odd) & No 58 Fore Hill.
 

Keys: 
House
Period: 
18. 19
List Date: 
19/06/72
Date: 
NONE
List Num: 
435358
Dist Num: 
5138
Side: 
SIDE West
Wall material: 
Local gault brick
Roof material: 
Slate
Refs: 
WATERSIDE1082 (West Side) No 2TL 5479 2/222 II GV(Including No 58 Fore Hill)A C18 range of brick houses probably re-roofed in the C19. 2 storeys. 5 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in flush cased frames. A raised brick band runs between the storeys. Simple cottage doors. Roof slate.Nos 2 to 12 (even) form a group with Nos 1 to 25 (odd) & No 58 Fore Hill.
S Status: 
CA
Other information: 
Also includes No 58, Fore Hill.
Entry Rec: 
04/11/86
Grid Ref: 
TL 54598014
Easting: 
5545900
Northing: 
2801400
Latitude: 
52.397035008231
Longitude: 
0.27236451616953

2 West End Ely, Cambs CB6 3BY

2
West End
Ely, Cambs
CB6 3BY
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

WEST END

1082 (North Side) No 2
TL 5380 4/228

II GV

An early-mid Cl9 brick house (Haddenham bricks).

2 storeys. 2 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars,in flush cased frames. A central doorcase has pilasters end cornice. Roof slate.

Nos 52A, 52 & Quayside House form a group with Nos 33 to 41 (consec) Nos 43 to 47 (odd), Nos 51 to 53 (consec) Malthouse adjoining No 53, Nos 55 and the Wharf and Nos 54 to 64 (even) Quayside.

Keys: 
House
Period: 
E 19 or M 19
List Date: 
19/06/72
Date: 
NONE
List Num: 
435366
Dist Num: 
5138
Side: 
North
Wall material: 
Local gault brick
Roof material: 
Slate
Refs: 
WEST END 1082 (North Side) No 2 TL 5380 4/228 II GV An early-mid Cl9 brick house (Haddenham bricks). 2 storeys. 2 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars,in flush cased frames. A central doorcase has pilasters end cornice. Roof slate. Nos 52A, 52 & Quayside House form a group with Nos 33 to 41 (consec) Nos 43 to 47 (odd), Nos 51 to 53 (consec) Malthouse adjoining No 53, Nos 55 and the Wharf and Nos 54 to 64 (even) Quayside.
S Status: 
CA
Other information: 
NONE
Entry Rec: 
04/11/86
Grid Ref: 
TL 53598022
Easting: 
5535900
Northing: 
2802200
Latitude: 
52.398035266181
Longitude: 
0.25771434677581

2-4 St Mary's Street Ely CB7 4ES

Location

2-4 St Mary's Street
CB7 4ES Ely, Cambs
2-4
St Mary's Street
Ely
CB7 4ES
Grade: 
II

A commercial and domestic building, erected in the C15, divided c.1700 with C19 alterations and c.1900 shop fronts.

Materials: It was constructed with a timber frame which was later encased in brickwork. The steeply pitched roof is covered with plain tiles relaid in the C20.

Plan: On plan 2-4 St Mary's Street is formed of a rectangular range to the street front with a pair of ranges running back down the plot to the rear.

Exterior: The main facade, to St Mary's Street, is two-storeys high and of painted brick. The wall of no.2 breaks forward from its neighbour at the centre of the facade. At ground-floor level are two, c.1900 shop fronts; the doors placed centrally as a pair. The shop front of no.4 is formed of a large window of two, fixed lights with small opening lights over, beneath a fascia board and moulded cornice. The door and window are framed with plain, timber pilasters. The shop front to no.2 is wider and comprises a window of three, fixed, vertical lights beneath a fascia board and a simple, timber canopy box. unlike its neighbour, only the window is framed by plain pilasters. At first-floor level the fenestration is late C20 in date; three windows lighting no.2 and a single window for no.4. A gault brick stack to the rear of no.2 heats the rear range and is mid C19 in date. At the rear, no.2 is lit at ground level by a mid-C19, 6 over 6 sash window.

Interior: Internally the building is divided into two seperate propoerties, numbers 2 and 4 St Mary's Street.

Access to the roof space of the front range of no.2 St Mary's Street is via a very small, c.1700, two-panel door, with H-L hinges, from the upper-floor room of the three-storey rear range. The roof form is a simple, undecorated C15 crown-post roof with down braces from crown posts to the ties. The majority of the rafters and several of the collars survive, one broken, and modern timberwork has been introduced to add support. The roof of the rear range is not visible, hidden by plasterwork and modern matchboard. The ties of the front-range roof are apparent at first-floor level. On the east side, the tie is arch-braced at the walls and a jowled post is apparent at the north end. A modern partition beneath the tie has created a small room at the east end. Studwork beneath the west-end tie forms a closed partition. In the rear range, a dog-leg stair on the back of the front range leads down from the upper to the first floor. Underneath it, a plain, plank door with c.1700 butterfly hinges, gives the date of the stairs. Also on the back of the front range is a winding stair which leads from first to ground-floor level. Behind the lower steps are three panels of moulded, c.1700 panelling. The ground floor, like the first, comprises a room in the front range and a room in the rear. The front room is used as a drapers shop. The pamment floor of the front room is divided into an area laid square at the entrance and the remainder, which is laid on an angle. The area of square-laid pamments is contained by the west wall, which divides nos. 2 and 4, on the one side and a substantial, broad chamfered and stopped, C15 bridging beam on the other. The stop respects the mid-point junction with axial beams, of which only the one on the west side survives. An C18 archway stands on the line of the main door, and presumably once formed a way to the back range.

The floor of the back range at ground-floor level is brick, laid to an interleafed herringbone pattern. On the east side, a fireplace is blocked and panelled over. The rear door leads into a shower room and to the way out into a small rear yard.

The remains of the continuation of the plain crown-post roof in no.2 St Mary's Street can be seen in the roof of what is now no.4, in the form of a length of the collar purlin, supported by a truss that forms part of a timber-framed partition which divides the two dwellings. A good number of oriignal rafters survive but modern timbers have been introduced to offer extra support, as well as broad, pegged collars. The date of the collars is unclear as at least one is lap-jointed into modern timber. The roof of the rear range may be contemporary but is formed simply of coupled rafters, pegged at the apex, with what appear fot be later collars added.

The arrangement of the upper floor seems to have been set out in c.1700. The straight stair rises from the ground floor to a landing at the junction of the front and rear range. Above the stair a small section of wall post and a tie beam is visible. The landing has early C19 stick balusters and a slender, turned newel. Off the landing there are two rooms to the rear, a room over the front range and a small cupboard. Each has a c.1700 two-panel door which was carried on H-L hinges, although the doors have now been turned and hung on later hinges. A corner fireplace in the room of the front range is open, whereas below the corner fireplace is blocked and covered by a modern radiator.

At ground floor level No.4 St Mary's Street has been opened up so that there is no division between the front and immediate rear room. From here a door leads into the rear-most room, now the kitchen.

History: By the time of Bishop Fordhams's survey of 1417, St Mary's Street (then High Row Street) had been established. Speed's Map of Ely of 1610 shows by that time the north side of St Mary's Street had been built up, although of course the map is not detailed enough to highlight particular buildings. There was considerable development in Ely between 1610 and the middle of the C18 when the number of buildings was estimated at 609 and brick was the established building material, as opposed to a mixture of materials earlier, including timber-framing.

204 St Mary's Street is likely to have been one of the buildings depicted on Speed's map as there is evidence internally of fabric dating to the C15. At the time of the publication of Speed's map, St Mary's Street was named 'High Row Street', which implies a location on a market place, and it may be that the building was then used as commercial premises. Surviving bridging beams and the roof structure would seem to indicate that the building was probably erected as a single property but c.1700 it was divided into two dwellings and the rear range of no.2 was either reformed into three storeys or added, its stairs serving both ranges. Nos 2 and 4 were refaced in brick at different times in the C18 or C19.

Deeds, which probably relate to no.2 St Mary's Street only, in the possession of the owners, provide evidence that the property was occupied by Paul Gotobed in 1783, a staymaker, and afterwards his daughter Mary. Mary Gotobed died in 1825 and the property was bequeathed to Mary Ind who subsequently sold it to Marshall Fisher, Yeoman, in 1838. In 1899 the Fisher family sold the property to Hannah Legge, the wife of a bootmaker.

The present shop fronts were installed c.1900. A photograph of c.1900, hanging in no.2, shows that the roof of no.4 was re-covered around that time and the roof of no.2 has been re-covered more recently. Both campaigns of work probably involved some repair to the roof structure.

Reasons for Designation: Nos 2 and 4 St Mary's Street, a commercial and domestic building erected in the C15, is designated at Grade II for the following principle reasons:

  • Architectural Interest: The building contains a significant proportion of fabric dating to the C15, notably the majoirty of a crown post roof. Fixtures and fittings of c.1700 date, notably several doors, illustrate how the building was used at that time.
  • Group Value: The building has strong group value with listed buildings in the vicinity, notably the adjoining no.6 St Mary's Street, listed at Grade II, and the cathedral church, listed at Grade I
List Date: 
07 October 2010
Date: 
C15, C17, C19
Wall material: 
Timber Frame and Brick
Roof material: 
Plain Tiles
Latitude: 
49.766185796709
Longitude: 
-7.5564486171492

20 High Street Ely, Cambs CB7 4JU

20
High Street
Ely, Cambs
CB7 4JU
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

A late C18 or early C19 plastered brick house probably incorporating an earlier structure, with a parapet on the front.

2 storeys. 2 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, with plain stucco, architraves. The ground storey has a C20 shop incorporated with the adjoining property No 22.

All the listed buildings in High Street except No 2 form a group with The Almonry, Wall to the gardens of the Almonry and Painted Chamber, The Sacristy Gate and Goldsmith's Tower, The College.

Keys: 
House, shop
Period: 
17, L 18 or E 19. M 20
List Date: 
23/09/50
Date: 
NONE
List Num: 
48743
Dist Num: 
5138
Side: 
South
Wall material: 
Local gault brick, render
Roof material: 
Slate
Refs: 
HIGH STREET 1082 (South Side) No 20 TL 5480 1/160 II GV A late C18 or early C19 plastered brick house probably incorporating an earlier structure, with a parapet on the front. 2 storeys. 2 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, with plain stucco, architraves. The ground storey has a C20 shop incorporated with the adjoining property No 22. All the listed buildings in High Street except No 2 form a group with The Almonry, Wall to the gardens of the Almonry and Painted Chamber, The Sacristy Gate and Goldsmith's Tower, The College.
S Status: 
CA
Other information: 
Formerly listed as List No 2/77A. Resurveyed at 19/06/72
Entry Rec: 
04/11/86
Grid Ref: 
TL 54108033
Easting: 
5541000
Northing: 
2803300
Latitude: 
52.398880162926
Longitude: 
0.2652554339196

20 St Mary's Street Ely, Cambs CB7 4ES

20
St Mary's Street
Ely, Cambs
CB7 4ES
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

An early C19 yellow gault brick house, part of a small pleasantly proportioned range of houses comprising Nos 20, 22 & 22A, set back from the buildings at the east end of St Mary's Street at No 20.

2 storeys. 3 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in plain reveals. The ground storey is at present spoiled by garage premises. Roof slate. Included for group value.

Nos 20, 22, 22A, Nos 24 to 30 (even) Nos 34, 36, 36A, 38, Nos 40 to 60 (even) form a group with Nos 13 to 29 (odd) & 29A, Parson's Almshouses & Nos 1 to 5 (odd) Downham Road.

Also Nos 20, 22, 22A, Nos 24 to 30 (even), Nos 34, 36, 36A, 38, Nos 40 to 60 (even). No 13 to 29 (odd) & 29A, parson's Almshouses form a group with No 20 Church Lane & the Parish church of St Mary.

Keys: 
House, garage
Period: 
E 19. M 20, L 20
List Date: 
19/06/72
Date: 
NONE
List Num: 
48783
Dist Num: 
5138
Side: 
North
Wall material: 
Gault brick
Roof material: 
Slate
Refs: 
ST MARY'S STREET 1082 (North Side) TL 5380 1/191 No 20 II GV An early C19 yellow gault brick house, part of a small pleasantly proportioned range of houses comprising Nos 20, 22 & 22A, set back from the buildings at the east end of St Mary's Street at No 20. 2 storeys. 3 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in plain reveals. The ground storey is at present spoiled by garage premises. Roof slate. Included for group value. Nos 20, 22, 22A, Nos 24 to 30 (even) Nos 34, 36, 36A, 38, Nos 40 to 60 (even) form a group with Nos 13 to 29 (odd) & 29A, Parson's Almshouses & Nos 1 to 5 (odd) Downham Road. Also Nos 20, 22, 22A, Nos 24 to 30 (even), Nos 34, 36, 36A, 38, Nos 40 to 60 (even). No 13 to 29 (odd) & 29A, parson's Almshouses form a group with No 20 Church Lane & the Parish church of St Mary.
S Status: 
CA
Other information: 
Included for group value.
Entry Rec: 
27/10/86
Grid Ref: 
TL 53948040
Easting: 
5539400
Northing: 
2804000
Latitude: 
52.399554077325
Longitude: 
0.26293763009524

21-23 Lynn Road Ely, Cambs CB6 1AA

21-23
Lynn Road
Ely, Cambs
CB6 1AA
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

2 houses. Mid C18.

Red and buff brick with brick plinth and plain-tile roof with brick central ridge stack. Single storey and attic; 2-window range of 6/6 sashes. Doorways to left and far right have moulded doorcases, flat hoods and plank doors. Central plank alleyway door has round-arched head. 2 2-light gabled dormers over.

Period: 
C18
List Date: 
15/01/96
List Num: 
452549
Refs: 
TL 5480 ELY LYNN ROAD (west side) 606- /1/10011 Nos.21 AND 23 GV II 2 houses. Mid C18. Red and buff brick with brick plinth and plain-tile roof with brick central ridge stack. Single storey and attic; 2-window range of 6/6 sashes. Doorways to left and far right have moulded doorcases, flat hoods and plank doors. Central plank alleyway door has round-arched head. 2 2-light gabled dormers over.
Latitude: 
49.766185796709
Longitude: 
-7.5564486171492

21-23 Waterside Ely, Cambs CB7 4AU

21-23
Waterside
Ely, Cambs
CB7 4AU
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

WATERSIDE

1082 (East Side) Nos 21 and 23
TL 5479 2/216

II GV

An early C19 gault brick house 2 storeys.

3 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in flush cased frames. The ground storey has a C19 shopfront. 6-panel doors have wood doorcases with pilasters and cornices. Roof slate.

Nos 1 to 25 (odd) form a group with Nos 2 to 12 (even) and No 58 Fore Hill.

Keys: 
House, shop
Period: 
E 19. L 19
List Date: 
19/06/72
Date: 
NONE
List Num: 
435341
Dist Num: 
5138
Side: 
SIDE East
Wall material: 
Gault brick
Roof material: 
Slate
Refs: 
WATERSIDE 1082 (East Side) Nos 21 and 23 TL 5479 2/216 II GV An early C19 gault brick house 2 storeys. 3 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in flush cased frames. The ground storey has a C19 shopfront. 6-panel doors have wood doorcases with pilasters and cornices. Roof slate. Nos 1 to 25 (odd) form a group with Nos 2 to 12 (even) and No 58 Fore Hill.
S Status: 
CA
Other information: 
NONE
Entry Rec: 
04/11/86
Grid Ref: 
TL 54648012
Easting: 
5546400
Northing: 
2801200
Latitude: 
52.396841203001
Longitude: 
0.27308961598721

21a-23 High Street Ely, Cambs CB4 4LQ

21a-23
High Street
Ely, Cambs
CB4 4LQ
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

Shops with domestic accommodation over, formerly commercial premises with domestic accommodation to the rear. Late Medieval with extensive recasting in the mid C18, and late C19 or early C20 shop fronts; that to number 23 with modern, arched glazing bars. Rendered brick, with possible fragmentary survival of timber-framing to the rear, and a plain tiled roof. L-shaped plan comprising a street front range adjoined at the rear by a range running back down the plot. Adjoins numbers 21 and 25 High Street.

EXTERIOR: Two storeys in height, with an additional attic storey in the front range. Pitched roof, gabled to the rear of the rear range, with a large central brick stack in the rear range. The street front elevation has two shop fronts at ground floor level (21a and 23 High Street). 21a has large plate glass windows with a recessed door to the left. Number 23 has multiple panes with arched glazing bars and a C20 door to the left. Above, the first floor is divided into three window bays, the openings containing early or mid C19 unhorned six over six, sashes. Three square headed dormers with modern casement windows, light the attic storey. A modern single storey addition has been made to the west side of the rear range.

INTERIOR: The roof structure of the street front range was not accessible but that of the rear range is formed of coupled rafters which may be C18 in date but is probably earlier, perhaps contemporary with the stack. There are some earlier re-used members and some later insertions. Doors at the upper level and at the first-floor level are mainly two panelled and date from the C18th. The winder stair up to the attic, with simple square newels and stick balusters might be expected to be C19 in date but in this context is also probably C18th. Timber framing may survive where the rear range adjoins the front range and a cross beam of the front range, exposed on the attic winder stair, has a broad chamfer and run out stop that may be late medieval in date. The first floor rooms of the front range were once panelled and a significant section of it survives on the front wall. Raised and fielded, with broad ovolo moulding, it is likely to be early or mid C18 in date and certainly predates the sash windows, the low internal sills for which cut into the panelling. The rear range at first-floor level comprises two rooms divided by the large brick stack. The first room has a late C18 or early C19 cast iron grate, however it is clear that this conceals an earlier fireplace, within the brick stack, of which almost nothing can be seen. To the left of the fireplace a battened timber door has H hinges of circa 1700 date. The rear room has an axial beam carried at one end by the stack and presumably here a blocked fireplace survives beneath. The beam is substantial, is chamfered and stopped and is late medieval. Beside the stack a small winder stair leads up to an attic room. At ground floor level the rear range has little of historic interest visible, although a substantial axial beam survives to the rear of the main stack. To the front of the stack the rear and front ranges have been opened up. This area is fitted out as modern commercial premises. A false ceiling conceals the ceiling above completely save for an C18 ovolo-moulded cross beam which probably marks the rear of the street- front range. It is suggested that the concealed ceiling is of historic interest.

HISTORY
The proximity of this property close to the cathedral church and the relationship between the High Street and the north side of the cathedral precinct would indicate that the street dates from at least as far back as the rebuilding of the cathedral church by Abbot Simeon after the Norman Conquest. The historic core of the city was laid out much as it is today by 1416. It must be expected therefore that the north side of the street, divided into burgage plots for rent in medieval times, potentially contains evidence of buildings of great antiquity. These burgage plots were of high status and most probably contained a mixture of commercial and domestic accommodation. By the time of the publication of Speed's map of Ely of 1610 the High Street was well developed. Drainage of the fens in the C17 lead to a period of prosperity, so that in the C17 and C18 properties were erected and refurbished.

21a and 23 High Street was in existence by the time of the C17 map. It is likely to have consisted of commercial premises on the street front with domestic accommodation in the range to the rear. Evidence in the building supports this, with the survival of a substantial late medieval brick stack in the rear range, heating rooms on each side of it. In the mid C18 the building was substantially refurbished. The front range was reroofed, at the same time creating the attic rooms, and the whole building was completely refitted. At first floor level the front room was panelled and two panel doors installed throughout. By the late early C20 the shop fronts were created, that to number 23 perhaps being C19 but altered with modern glazing bars. It may have been at this time that an alleyway between 21 and 23 High Street, which formerly gave access to the rear of the plot, was built into and the two separate units of 21a and 23 created.The roof was re-tiled in the early C21.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION
21a and 23 high Street, Ely is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

* 21a and 23 High Street Ely contains the remains of a late medieval commercial and domestic building; notably a large brick stack with blocked fireplaces and associated axial beams, in the rear range.

* Fixtures and fittings from an extensive mid C18 refurbishment survive well, particularly at the upper floor level, notably ovolo moulded panelling and two-panel doors.

* The building benefits from group value with other listed buildings in the vicinity, notably 49 and 33 High Street, which retain evidence of similar developmental phasing, and with the cathedral precinct.

List Date: 
17/11/08
List Num: 
505459
Refs: 
ELY 606/0/10027 HIGH STREET 17-NOV-08 21A AND 23 II Shops with domestic accommodation over, formerly commercial premises with domestic accommodation to the rear. Late Medieval with extensive recasting in the mid C18, and late C19 or early C20 shop fronts; that to number 23 with modern, arched glazing bars. Rendered brick, with possible fragmentary survival of timber-framing to the rear, and a plain tiled roof. L-shaped plan comprising a street front range adjoined at the rear by a range running back down the plot. Adjoins numbers 21 and 25 High Street. EXTERIOR: Two storeys in height, with an additional attic storey in the front range. Pitched roof, gabled to the rear of the rear range, with a large central brick stack in the rear range. The street front elevation has two shop fronts at ground floor level (21a and 23 High Street). 21a has large plate glass windows with a recessed door to the left. Number 23 has multiple panes with arched glazing bars and a C20 door to the left. Above, the first floor is divided into three window bays, the openings containing early or mid C19 unhorned six over six, sashes. Three square headed dormers with modern casement windows, light the attic storey. A modern single storey addition has been made to the west side of the rear range. INTERIOR: The roof structure of the street front range was not accessible but that of the rear range is formed of coupled rafters which may be C18 in date but is probably earlier, perhaps contemporary with the stack. There are some earlier re-used members and some later insertions. Doors at the upper level and at the first-floor level are mainly two panelled and date from the C18th. The winder stair up to the attic, with simple square newels and stick balusters might be expected to be C19 in date but in this context is also probably C18th. Timber framing may survive where the rear range adjoins the front range and a cross beam of the front range, exposed on the attic winder stair, has a broad chamfer and run out stop that may be late medieval in date. The first floor rooms of the front range were once panelled and a significant section of it survives on the front wall. Raised and fielded, with broad ovolo moulding, it is likely to be early or mid C18 in date and certainly predates the sash windows, the low internal sills for which cut into the panelling. The rear range at first-floor level comprises two rooms divided by the large brick stack. The first room has a late C18 or early C19 cast iron grate, however it is clear that this conceals an earlier fireplace, within the brick stack, of which almost nothing can be seen. To the left of the fireplace a battened timber door has H hinges of circa 1700 date. The rear room has an axial beam carried at one end by the stack and presumably here a blocked fireplace survives beneath. The beam is substantial, is chamfered and stopped and is late medieval. Beside the stack a small winder stair leads up to an attic room. At ground floor level the rear range has little of historic interest visible, although a substantial axial beam survives to the rear of the main stack. To the front of the stack the rear and front ranges have been opened up. This area is fitted out as modern commercial premises. A false ceiling conceals the ceiling above completely save for an C18 ovolo-moulded cross beam which probably marks the rear of the street- front range. It is suggested that the concealed ceiling is of historic interest. HISTORY The proximity of this property close to the cathedral church and the relationship between the High Street and the north side of the cathedral precinct would indicate that the street dates from at least as far back as the rebuilding of the cathedral church by Abbot Simeon after the Norman Conquest. The historic core of the city was laid out much as it is today by 1416. It must be expected therefore that the north side of the street, divided into burgage plots for rent in medieval times, potentially contains evidence of buildings of great antiquity. These burgage plots were of high status and most probably contained a mixture of commercial and domestic accommodation. By the time of the publication of Speed's map of Ely of 1610 the High Street was well developed. Drainage of the fens in the C17 lead to a period of prosperity, so that in the C17 and C18 properties were erected and refurbished. 21a and 23 High Street was in existence by the time of the C17 map. It is likely to have consisted of commercial premises on the street front with domestic accommodation in the range to the rear. Evidence in the building supports this, with the survival of a substantial late medieval brick stack in the rear range, heating rooms on each side of it. In the mid C18 the building was substantially refurbished. The front range was reroofed, at the same time creating the attic rooms, and the whole building was completely refitted. At first floor level the front room was panelled and two panel doors installed throughout. By the late early C20 the shop fronts were created, that to number 23 perhaps being C19 but altered with modern glazing bars. It may have been at this time that an alleyway between 21 and 23 High Street, which formerly gave access to the rear of the plot, was built into and the two separate units of 21a and 23 created.The roof was re-tiled in the early C21. REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION 21a and 23 high Street, Ely is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * 21a and 23 High Street Ely contains the remains of a late medieval commercial and domestic building; notably a large brick stack with blocked fireplaces and associated axial beams, in the rear range. * Fixtures and fittings from an extensive mid C18 refurbishment survive well, particularly at the upper floor level, notably ovolo moulded panelling and two-panel doors. * The building benefits from group value with other listed buildings in the vicinity, notably 49 and 33 High Street, which retain evidence of similar developmental phasing, and with the cathedral precinct.
Latitude: 
49.766185796709
Longitude: 
-7.5564486171492

22 St Marys Street Ely, Cambs CB7 4ES

22
St Marys Street
Ely, Cambs
CB7 4ES
Parish ID: 
10
Grade: 
II

ST MARY'S STREET

1082 (North Side) Nos 22 & 22A
TL 5380 1/192

II GV

A pair of early C19 brick houses (Haddenham bricks), No 22A is now painted.

2 storeys. 3 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in plain reveals. No 22 has a 4-panel door with a plain rectangular fanlight and No 22A has a 6-panel double-door with the upper panels glazed. The doorcases are wood with pilasters and cornices. Roofs slate. Nos 20, 22 and 22A are a small pleasantly proportioned range of houses set back from the houses set back form the buildings at the east end of St Mary's Street at No 20.

Nos 20, 22, 22A, Nos 24 to 30 (even), Nos 34, 36, 36A, 38, Nos 40 to 60 (even) form a group with Nos 13 to 29 (odd) & 29A, Parson's Almshouses & Nos 1 to 5 (odd) Downham Road.

Also Nos 20, 22, 22A, Nos 24 to 30 (even), Nos 34 36, 36A, 38, Nos 40 to 60 (even), Nos 13 to 29 (odd) & 29A, Parson's Almshouses form a group with No 20 Church Lane & the Parich Church of St Mary.

Keys: 
House
Period: 
E 19
List Date: 
19/06/72
Date: 
NONE
List Num: 
48784
Dist Num: 
5138
Side: 
North
Wall material: 
Local gault brick
Roof material: 
Slate
Refs: 
ST MARY'S STREET 1082 (North Side) Nos 22 & 22A TL 5380 1/192 II GV A pair of early C19 brick houses (Haddenham bricks), No 22A is now painted. 2 storeys. 3 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars, in plain reveals. No 22 has a 4-panel door with a plain rectangular fanlight and No 22A has a 6-panel double-door with the upper panels glazed. The doorcases are wood with pilasters and cornices. Roofs slate. Nos 20, 22 and 22A are a small pleasantly proportioned range of houses set back from the houses set back form the buildings at the east end of St Mary's Street at No 20. Nos 20, 22, 22A, Nos 24 to 30 (even), Nos 34, 36, 36A, 38, Nos 40 to 60 (even) form a group with Nos 13 to 29 (odd) & 29A, Parson's Almshouses & Nos 1 to 5 (odd) Downham Road. Also Nos 20, 22, 22A, Nos 24 to 30 (even), Nos 34 36, 36A, 38, Nos 40 to 60 (even), Nos 13 to 29 (odd) & 29A, Parson's Almshouses form a group with No 20 Church Lane & the Parich Church of St Mary.
S Status: 
CA
Other information: 
NONE
Entry Rec: 
27/10/86
Grid Ref: 
TL 53938040
Easting: 
5539300
Northing: 
2804000
Latitude: 
52.399556889996
Longitude: 
0.26279075328242

Pages